Four Holiday Wardrobe Mistakes To Avoid This Summer

With summer just around the corner, many of us will be thinking of compiling our holiday wardrobe.

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When it comes to packing for a holiday, the whole process can be challenging. You’ll need beachwear, daywear and nightwear. You’ll want comfort, practicality and style. And you’ll have to achieve all of this whilst staying within your designated baggage allowance. For this reason, an article in Elle suggests that a holiday capsule wardrobe made up of just ten garments could be the key to a “carefree summer.”

That is what you should do when packing for a holiday – but what shouldn’t you do?

Don’t be tight

We’re not talking about being stingy – we’re talking about clothing that is too tight or shorts that are too short. Not only does squeezing into super-small clothing make for an unflattering look, but it will make you hot, bothered and sweaty in the sunshine. Opt for loose-fitting tees, a swishy blue maxi dress, and wide-leg shorts for a comfortable and effortlessly stylish look.

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Don’t get stuck in a rut

Many of us have a holiday wardrobe that we store away for the rest of the year then bring out summer after summer. While this is undoubtedly frugal, it means that your holiday look becomes a tired and dated one. Don’t be afraid to branch out and treat yourself to a few new and up-to-date pieces. Modern variations of your summer faves (such as linen shirts and strappy sundresses) are re-hashed year after year, so keep your wardrobe fresh.

Don’t neglect accessories

A handful of well-chosen accessories will take up very little space in your case and can totally revamp your look. Opt for gold statement earrings or a necklace alongside an AX Paris blue maxi dress or a wide-brim sunhat with a floaty kimono. A stylish pair of sunglasses will also be your best friend on holiday, so choose them well.

Don’t scrimp on swimwear

Good swimwear is an invaluable investment that will make or break your pool-side look. You’ll be spending a lot of time in your bikini or costume, so make sure it’s a good one with adequate support and a style that flatters your shape. You’ll find that good-quality swimwear will be less prone to sagging or fading, too.

Designers of menswear and luxury fashion

Luxury fashion no longer means lavishness, as a new generation of menswear labels is showing with its fresh focus on evergreen classics and enviable basics.

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Each of the following four examples have all been born as part of a second incarnation for an industry veteran and, whilst still low-profile, they are emerging as the new face of high-end fashion.

Visionary moves on

Former Thom Browne men’s design director, Robert Childs, moved on to launch his own expertly edited collection. The range focuses on everyday fashion – or clothes that will withstand the tides of fashion – in contemporary, breathable fabrics, whilst taking inspiration from sharp, masculine silhouettes of days gone by.

The collection’s star pieces include an effortlessly sophisticated made-to-measure tuxedo, which can be crafted in a client’s choice of fabrics and can pair boldly with Childs’ floral racer-style shirt for an undeniably fashionable look.

A fashionable force

Paul Helbers has moved on from the likes of Louis Vuitton and Maison Margiela to focus on his own Helbers label. The line includes staples such as leisurewear, tailoring and knitwear and aims to steer clear of trends influencing other mens designer clothes, favouring instead a contemporary take on enduring styles.

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Bolder look

Deveaux joins the ranks of the more contemporary and bolder ranges to be found amongst the brands on sites such as https://www.ejmenswear.com. It is the brainchild of Matt Breen, formerly of Carson Street Clothiers, and it aims to deliver stylish and unpretentious made-in-America style. Read more about the latest trends in mens fashion on the Guardian Online website at https://www.theguardian.com/fashion/mens-fashion.

A family affair

Brothers Mario and Pierluigi Boglioli sold their famous tailoring house and have gone on to launch Gigi, a new laidback label with a focus on relaxed tailoring. Every garment has the brand’s motto stitched in, reading ‘Don’t look back’.

The label gives a nod to traditional suit-making and undeniably builds on the Boglioli brothers’ deconstructed aesthetics, whilst unmistakably paving the way for a new menswear era. This is traditional tailoring for the modern world.

All of these new labels have one thing in common – the need to make fashion wearable once again. Gone are the days when high-end fashion had to mean outlandish design. Instead, this new era seems proud to look back on the past for inspiration, whilst offering a healthy injection of contemporary style.